7 Reasons for Adults to Take Online Piano Lessons

Many adults are intimidated by the prospect of learning to play the piano. After all, if a person didn’t take lessons as a child, they may think it’s too late to pick up any piano skills after they’ve turned 30. However, it turns out that adults have some crucial advantages over kids where learning to play the piano is concerned. With Piano in 21 Days, adults of any age can learn to play their favorite songs in a short time.  

 

1. Adults Already Have a Firm Grasp on Music Because They’ve Listened to It for a Lifetime

Before lessons even begin, adult students have an edge: They’ve already spent years listening to their favorite music. Most people have a list of songs they’d like to learn how to play, and this program helps them do just that. Because an adult has already been exposed to music, when they’re learning a new piece, they can relate it to songs they already know. Such knowledge can help a person understand the sounds of chords and chord groupings relatively easily. An adult student can quickly grasp basic musical structures and their presence in a range of songs, which is an ability rarely found in younger students. 

 

2. Adults Have the Focus and Discipline Needed to Stick to a Practice Schedule

During childhood, a person’s brain is still learning how to adapt to the environment. A child’s brain can form and change connections easily, which makes them hardwired to learn music easily. With adults, it’s possible to change connections and form new ones, but it takes a different approach and a bit more work. Adults’ brains are full of life experiences, which can be beneficial when using a program like Piano in 21 Days. 

While the program allows students to learn at their own pace, music is like any other skill in that it requires practice. The primary advantage adult students have is that they’re better than kids at figuring out high-level rules and maintaining the discipline needed to adhere to a practice schedule. 

 

3. Adults Have an Increased Ability to Take on Abstract, Complicated Concepts

Not only do adult learners have the discipline needed to learn how to play the piano, they’re also better than children at grasping abstract concepts. For instance, it’s easy for adults to remember scales and other rules, and to apply those rules to different songs and compositions. By comparison, children need a great deal of practice and repetition to learn those rules.  

 

The most substantial difference in the song-based learning approach is in adults’ tendency to analyze things. While children usually play what’s in front of them and they try to get through it as fast as possible, adults tend to be perfectionists. With Piano in 21 Days, adult players learn how to put aside that perfectionism, which helps them learn more quickly. 

 

4. Adults Don’t Feel Forced or Pressured to Learn the Piano

While parental pressure and lofty goals often compel kids to learn to play, adults are truly able to remain in control of their own fates. Because no one is forcing them to do it, adult students are typically excited to practice simply for the sake of learning something new. This motivation is quite powerful, and it has beneficial cognitive effects that increase a player’s ability to learn quickly. In this program, those who really want to learn to play their favorite songs on the piano can do so in just three weeks. 

 

5. Playing the Piano is a Great Stress Reliever

Everyone knows that music soothes the soul, and that knowledge is backed up by numerous studies that prove music’s stress-reducing abilities. Today’s adults are under more stress than ever, and these qualities are another powerful motivational tool for students. Music releases dopamine in the brain’s reward centers, the same ones that respond to food and other stimuli. In fact, many believe that it’s more difficult to find parts of the brain that do not respond to music than to find those that do. 

 

Piano in 21 Days’ approach makes it perfect for busy professionals who want to fit in a music lesson during a hectic workday. With these lessons, workers get a bit of an escape from the drudgery of the office. The biggest part of the process isn’t just learning how to play piano; it’s decompressing and learning how to relax.  Music has certain mood benefits that make it easier to learn to play, which comes in handy for adult students. Maintaining an upbeat, positive mood is typically great for adults’ sleep habits, cognitive ability, and overall well-being, which can all enhance brain function and retention. 

 

6. It’s a Great Workout for the Brain

During adulthood, learning how to play the piano is a great way to train the brain. Learning how to play one’s favorite songs by assembling their individual components is a way for students to challenge their brains, keeping them sharper and more alert for a longer time. Not only can increased cognitive function help to fight the earliest signs of dementia, it helps students keep their brains active and enjoy a greater quality of life. These, along with music’s mood-elevating and stress-relieving qualities, make music a wonderful way to give the brain a workout. 

 

7. It’s a Hit at Parties

The last advantage may seem superficial to some, but it’s still worth mentioning. People tend to gravitate toward those who exude confidence through their musical abilities, and when a person can play today’s most popular songs on the piano, they’re likely to be one of the main attractions at parties and social events. Whether a student wants to be the life of the party, or they want to take on a side gig playing at weddings and in nightclubs, this program can give them the skills they need. 

 

Find Out More Today

With all of these benefits, it’s easy to see why this program is so popular among adult learners. For more information, or to get started with Piano in 21 Days, visit our website today. 

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